Diving on the Great Barrier Reef: Pixie’s Pinnacle

A giant clam and some vibrant yellow coral at Pixie's Pinnacle

A giant clam and some vibrant yellow coral at Pixie’s Pinnacle

Pixie’s Pinnacle is a massive cone-shaped dive site covered with hard and soft corals. There are loads of giant clams that express a variety of colors and patterns. There are also tons of hawkfish and cod!

I got the settings on my camera more or less working for me at this dive site, so the colors of the fish and the corals really came through. The photo of the freckled hawkfish in particular is a pretty nice one, as well as the coral cod.

 

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Diving on the Great Barrier Reef: Two Towers

A sea star at Two Towers on the Great Barrier Reef

A sea star at Two Towers on the Great Barrier Reef

Two Towers is a dual pinnacle dive site that’s home to an amazing array of coral and fish life. There are turtles, sea snakes, and giant clams to be found amongst smaller life like wrasses, groupers, shrimp, and cod.

I got a few good shots of the coral structures, including some vibrant feather stars and highly textured mushroom leather coral. I also love the photo of the closed clam, with its dramatic lightning bolt shape.

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Diving on the Great Barrier Reef: Challenger Bay

Yellow-Banded Sweetlips at Challenger Bay in the Great Barrier Reef

Yellow-Banded Sweetlips at Challenger Bay in the Great Barrier Reef

I spent a weekend aboard the Taka Ribbon Reef Explorer, a 5-day trip organized by Deep Sea Divers Den. It was an absolutely incredible trip where I had the opportunity to dive 14 times on the Great Barrier Reef and go snorkeling with Minke whales, who are in the middle of their yearly migration south. The diving far surpassed my expectations, as the boat took us to far north diving spots that few other companies go to. In fact, one of our dive sites had only been visited by three other dive groups before us!

This set of photos comes from the Challenger Bay dive site, a shallow reef with abundant soft coral formations and schools of angelfish, sweetlips, and wrasses.

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